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Forté Mavens in the Marketplace: Tulle La La

Forté Mavens in the Marketplace: Tulle La La


– This is literally going with me on every single trend moving forward. I’m obsessed with this. – About 85% of brides
describe wedding planning as stressful and not fun. There has to be a better way to do it. My name is Marguerite Pressley Davis, and I am the founder
and CEO of Tulle La La. Essentially, we’re a
bride’s wedding journey BFF. We guide her through her wedding planning with our monthly tool boxes. One of the things that
I love about Tulle La La is that we’ve been able take technology and apply it to an industry, where it hasn’t been big in the past, and really use it to make a difference. The way that it works is,
you go to Tullelala.com. You tell us all about where you are in your wedding planning,
what you have left, what you’ve done, when
your wedding date is. And what that allows us to do is use that information to
customize your monthly tools. – Wow, it says happily ever after. This represents the reminder to book overnight accommodations for you and your new hubby after your reception. Make sure your plans are clear
on where you’ll be staying and how you’ll be getting there. This tool also represents
finalizing the room count for guests at your selected hotel and your needs have fulfilled all the requirements in your
contract with the hotel. Aw, this is so cute. – My background is actually in finance. It gave me a great perspective to be able to see behind the scenes. What does it take to make
a successful company? Could I apply those learnings
to a business of my own? Like many ideas that
you have for business, it’s something that you’ve
been through yourself, and you’re like, there has
to be a better way to do it. The very first place to start is actually making sure there is a
need for what your idea is. I feel like sometimes business plans can really get you into
analysis paralysis. And you put all your time
into developing this plan, but they forget the important step of actually talking to the
people who they want to sell to. Everywhere I saw a bride, anywhere I could go and find a bride, I was talking to them. I was making sure that what
I thought the problem was was truly the problem that
they were experiencing. – Now when I first got engaged, I went on a hunt to find the best bridal subscription that I could, and I went through tons of YouTube videos, and really couldn’t find
any bridal subscription that had things that
weren’t tacky, or cheap. I came across somebody unboxing a Tulle La La bridal
subscription, I was like, wow! – I didn’t have to then have to go and implement something and
then go back and fix it. I was sure that I was
targeting the specific problem and I could then tailor
my product and my service based on my learnings
from my target client. What’s important to know about expanding from one product and one city to now 10 different product offerings in five different continents
is, it was a process. It was really hard to
go through those stages and important to navigate time wise to be really really critical about when we wanted to make the shift, when we wanted to grow,
when we wanted to scale. Oftentimes companies fail
because they grow too fast. For us, we completely bootstrapped. I started Tulle La La with the bonus that I actually got from my
full time corporate career, and we bootstrapped it. Every dollar that we make we reinvest, because it’s important for me that we are growing at a rate
where we can sustain, where we don’t outgrow ourselves and where my funding model still makes sense. There are definitely days
when I’ve wanted to quit, I just wanted to throw in the towel. I think to myself, I
could have been so cushy in mergers and acquisitions consulting, which I had done prior to leaving. But it’s knowing my why,
that keeps me going. It’s thinking back to, why did
I embark upon this journey? What problem was I trying to solve? What difference was I trying to make? And relating back to that
why, is what keeps me going in those times that I’ve wanted to quit, in those times where it’s
just been such hard work, and it seems like quitting would actually be the easy thing to do.

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